Tag

travel

Browsing

Surfing and figuring out my next move after Taiwan were how I spent my last few days in Dulan. I had a few more stops along the way but was starting to think after 3 months here I may never leave. After all; the people are amazingly friendly, the food is delicious and the scenery is stunning. In Hualien, in-between horrific sunburn and passing out in the shower, I met many travelers who were discussing the Philippines. Mainly in a negative light. Due to the recent bombings in Manila and the increase in pirate kidnapping, many foreigners had cancelled their flights.  Obviously this piqued my interest enough to revisit the conversation with a new set of travelers. The result: booking three flights to get myself to Siargao Island.

siargao fisherman
Fisherman life on the island of Siargao
The mission of making it to Siargao Island

After some catching up in Kaohsiung and Taipei it’s a flight to Manila. Arriving so early I’m left will little to do with my evening. It’s finally time to create a massive conga line. First set back hits: I don’t have an exit flight out of the Philippines. I attempt to argue the fact I don’t know where I’m going after Siargao Island. I follow with a promise to leave within 30 days. Both arguments failing I leave the line and proceed to panic. Searching for cheap flights I give myself two weeks in the Philippines then fly to Hong Kong. Indonesia is actually where I wanted to go but hadn’t planned when and Hong Kong was the cheapest next to Taiwan. I had just come from Taiwan so Hong Kong it was. Note to self; get fucking organised!

siargao hidden beaches
Hidden beach in Siargao

Landing in Manila in the early hours of the morning I discover no food available. In fact, only the dim light of several vending machines offer a possibility of nourishment. I find only sugary drinks and water. No coffee. I repeat the earlier note made to ones self; get fucking organised! My next flight is to Cebu. I’m met with the same airport dilemma. Trying to keep spirits high I wait around for my flight and hope the plane serves food. There is no food. But it’s okay, one more flight and I’ll make it to Siargao Island by the morning. The plane to Siargao is the smallest I have ever been on. I’m relieved it isn’t full, not just for the weight but also my small hand luggage sized suitcase is too large for the over head compartment and under the seat.

From Siargao airport to Paglaom hostel
Siargao sunny paglaom hostel
Sunny and pup

The airport is fairly out-of-the-way to the main strip of the island. I booked transfer via Paglaom hostel and I recommend others book in advance. I had been awake through the night without food and so was grateful to climb into an empty air-conditioned van. The desire to sleep lifted as I got my first view of life in the Philippines. The island is a paradox. It’s poverty and paradise almost overshadowing each other. A place resembling the beauty of a Monet where upon the illusion of perfection is stripped away once you look closely at the detail. The waters reflect the sun off its crisp waves and plastic bottles. The children joyfully laugh on the beaches as they weave bracelets for their income.

siargao Filipino food
Island dinner

None of this is to dissuade anyone from visiting this once secret island. There is enormous life and beauty here. But with Siargao’s secrecy slowing disappearing, so is its natural beauty. It is not the influx of tourists to this paradise that bares the fault alone. Siargao island isn’t fully equipped to become a tourist hot-spot. There is no recycling in place and little in the way of medical facilities. The more resorts appear though, which is at a rapid speed, the more funding is going into protecting Siargao’s landscape and local people.

The home of Paglaom
siargao stand up paddle boarding
SUP day island hopping

Paglaom hostel has a vibe like no other. I arrive on family dinner day, obviously with no food to contribute. I was told it would be enough just to help prepare. Quickly showering I was immediately told I looked 100 times better than I did on arrival! We ate, we drank, we played questionable games and by the end of the night I was booked onto a SUP tour to a small island. This is the type of hostel where if you are traveling alone and want to meet people you’ve got it all. Strangers become family. Sunny and Coy are amazing and have a chalk board where they let you know what’s going on daily. Sunny also runs a small NGO doing beach clean ups and educating the youth of General Luna on protecting the environment. Coy is an amazing surfer who will teach you the best stand up technique on the kitchen table, and their dogs will keep you company if you fancy a quieter night in.

Things to do on Siargao island

Siargao is known as the surfing capital of the Philippines. With the famous Cloud 9 bringing surfers together from all over the world since the 80’s. It’s actually how the secret of Siargao was whispered among the tourists. But this slice of paradise doesn’t just cater to surfers. With yoga, tidal pools, caves and lagoons just being a taste of what is on offer here it attracts all kinds of travelers. Siargao is definitely a spot for nature lovers and beach bums. One thing I definitely recommend doing is island hopping. This often comes with lunch and is a great was to socialize with all your new hostel buddies. The waters are crystal clear providing a great opportunity for snorkeling among the coral and the beaches are a blinding white.

Magpupungko tidal pool
Magpupungko Tidal Pool

The best way to get around Siargao island is to rent a scooter. It will cost you around 350 pesos a day to explore this natural landscape. As a side-note; many of the hostels and restaurants are off the main strip and the roads turn into dirt tracks. With the high possibility of rain suddenly surrounding you these tracks become murky pools that are less than fun to ride through. If you are here to surf get yourself a bike with a rack in place so you can take your board to cloud 9 with ease. A great place not to miss is the Magpupungko Pool which is located in Pilar, about an hours drive from General Luna. This is the only tidal pool in the Philippines I have been told and offers an amazing spot to swim, separated from the ocean by a large reef that acts as a walk way during low tide.

siargao cloud 9 walkway
Cloud 9 pier
Leaving Siargao Island
siargao huts in water
secret island huts

Having to leave after a week was awful. All I kept saying to myself was ‘this is why you don’t book flights in advance!’ I was kicking myself for only giving two weeks to the Philippines. I had let the recent news and travelers worries affect my decision. Many of the people I met had cancelled their next set of flights to extend their stay in this paradise. I wanted to do the same but I had my next destination booked and didn’t mind a reason to come back to Siargao. I toyed with the idea of looking for work at a resort and just staying forever! After saying goodbye to Sunny and Coy it was the start of my journey to Palawan. Puerto Princesa was my intended stop for a week before heading to Hong Kong….not Indonesia….again; get fucking organised.

siargao beach clean up

siargao crystal clear water

siargao sunsets
Siargao sunsets

 

 

 

Hello blog that I have neglected for sooo many months!!! When traveling it’s hard not to get caught up in all the people you meet, the new places to discover, the random adventures that take you off course but it doesn’t matter because you’re traveling and totally free!!! But now that I have settled for a little while I miss my blog and being able to relive those adventures. So I’m casting my mind back to volunteering in the surf town of Dulan and getting so caught up in the lifestyle there I stayed on a little longer than planned! This is also where I said goodbye to blogging for a little while! So here goes…

I Lift my rucksack with a grimace. My back is as red as it was the day I got horrendously sunburnt. The walk to the station is less than 10 minutes. I debate cancelling my trip to the surf town of Dulan to stay in Hualien just to delay carrying this bag. I know little about Dulan. I’m told it’s small; as in one road kind of small. Apparently it’s only good if your into water sports. I have no experience with water sports and I’m avoiding a beach currently. How I find myself on a train heading south is beyond me.

Surf Town of Dulan
wagaligong volunteers
Wagaligong Volunteers

What actually brings me to Dulan is another Workaway volunteering opportunity at WaGaLiGong Surf Hostel. The hostel looks to offer a chilled atmosphere and use of a surf board for volunteers. This is also an area that offers aboriginal music and an art scene. Unsure of how much of this surf town I’ll experience while still resembling a lobster, I remain positive throughout the train journey.

The excitement is stalled as I attempt to figure out where I’m going. I find Taitung’s bus station soon enough. From here I fail to find anyone who speaks English. I’m swiftly taken over to a different section of the bus stop once I announce my destination. Turns out there are three sections for the different local buses. Several locals are showing me various buses and their times for me to choose from. Taitung, as with the rest of Taiwan, is full of friendly locals willing to help where they can.

Welcome to WaGaLiGong
local craft dulan taiwan
local crafts

30 minutes later I leave the bus and find myself dropped on the side of the road. Looking down this single street I reach for my phone to use google maps and suddenly realize I’m directly outside the hostel. I’m greeted by a fellow volunteer from Czech Republic. There is also a Brazilian/American here, a Taiwanese/American and a stylish Parisian. Within an hour of my arrival another Taiwanese volunteer arrives. The first day is about settling in and exploring my new surroundings.

sugar factory dulan taiwan
The Sugar Factory

As I’ve said there is only one main street to this Surf town and yet there is a surprising amount to discover here. The area has the most charm of anywhere I’ve visited in Taiwan so far. The Sugar factory is a must see for its graffiti and quirky coffee shops and local souvenirs. I’m able to stumble into the abandoned side of the sugar factory to discover just off to the left is a recording studio! There is an endless row of hostels that lead all the way to the beach. I imagine the amount of beds must out way the amount of guests they receive. Who the hell knows about this little town?! So many people skip Dulan and find themselves in Kenting, the well-known surf spot that also caters for diving and snorkeling. They are missing out.

Beach, bonfires and pizza!

Wandering down the street with my fellow volunteers I quickly become aware of all the volunteers here via Workaway. We discover a beach bonfire is happening and that’s are evening planned. The waves are crashing as though angered by never receiving peace. There are people jumping in the waves screaming with laughter at every violent hit. Thinking of my tender skin I remain on the sand sitting a comfortable distance away from the heat of the flames. We have street dogs joining us as I discover they often do. Everyone is sharing travel stories and although tired I’m very much content.

dulan locals taiwan
discovering local food

The following day I start my training. The surf hostel has a restaurant and yoga room. It feels like you are visiting your surfing friends and kind of moved in for a while. They have amazing pizza here cooked by Tienie and the hilarious Mark who will take you on the water for surfing. The work is easy and often involves interacting with guests. The cleaning is a sweaty mission but you shower and are done for the day. Volunteers get half price on food and surfing lessons so once my skin heels I’m there! For now, pizza.

Finding my surfing feet
wagaligong surf class
Surfs Up

“So are you a goofy foot or natural?” Errrm, excuse me? I quickly learn the question is to ascertain whether I surf with my left or right leg forward. Having never surfed I didn’t know. So began the simulation on the sand. Turns out I’m a natural footed surfer. We stay on the sand for sometime creating a map of the water with stones. We learn the layout and the area which Mark calls the factory. It’s where we were to move onto next to practice going out and coming in like a factory line. Nice and slow first timer steps. Of course though there is a storm coming and Marks eyes light up. We’re going into the deep end!

wagaligong surf class
Surfing techniques

Mark pushed us off a couple of times until we got the hang of that feeling when a wave catches you. Riding a wave and feeling the speed it takes you while looking down at the calm water below in comparison is really like nothing else I’ve experienced before. I didn’t even care that it was 7am anymore. We lost Mark a few times when he just couldn’t resist riding a wave. His apologetic self swimming back out to us open-mouthed newbies at the sheer skill this guy has! After a couple of hours we are starving and I need to return to work.

Forgetting to leave Dulan

After two weeks working with some amazing people in a beautiful place I wasn’t ready to leave. One of the benefits of volunteering with Wagaligong is half price on all future stays. I took up home in the yoga room for a further week and spent my days surfing, doing yoga and hiking with the street dogs. Wagaligong staying true to the spirit of surfing culture also participates in organised beach clean ups and so I was incredibly happy to get the chance to give something back to this magical place! I recommend the surf town of Dulan to every traveler, it truly is a little gem!

When I finally drew myself away I had a brief stop in Kaohsiung to see friends and babysit a bearded dragon followed by a reunion in Taipei with a previous workawayer. Then it was off to the Philippines 🙂

recycling dulan taiwan
Recycling craft
dulan views taiwan
Dulan Mountain views
dulan coastline taiwan
Dulan’s coastline

Leaving my last Workaway in Keelung I was feeling it was time for a break from volunteering. The next stop on my east coast route of Taiwan was Hualien. Everyone had told me this was a place for the scenery. Without looking much into what to do in Hualien, I booked the train ticket and made my way south.

I booked into a hostel called Big Bear Hostel conveniently located in walking distance from the train station. The weather is humid with the lightest of rain when I arrive. Settling in I venture out to get a hold of my surroundings. In Keelung I was used to wandering outside and finding an array of markets full of every kind of vegetable, fruit and meat that you could desire. Walking from my street into the main city I’ve yet to come across fresh produce. Instead there are the neon lights of 7 11 and family mart everywhere. Choosing a local restaurant for food, I head back to the hostel in the evening to meet the other travelers.

Beginning to explore Hualien

I wake up fairly late having decided not to set an alarm and realize it’s not raining. The sun though has yet to show itself from the what to do in Hualienclouds. My “what to do in Hualien” list includes finding myself on a beach. It may not be a tropical beach but Chishingtan Scenic area was less than an hours walk away to a stony but pretty looking coast line.

There are of course buses to take you to this beach in around 10 minutes or alternatively, Hualien is much easier to rent a motorbike than Keelung, providing you have an international license. I always choose to walk though as it allows me to see the locals of the area and discover unexpected charms of a place. Passing temples and shop owners I follow the road and come across what is either a prison or an air-force. Which ever it may be it creates a stark contrast of barbed wire cutting into the now blue skyline. Lined with mountains and palm trees the road makes me think of pictures of California.

Pebbles and currents

what to do in HualienBreaking from the main road I head towards the pink and white colored houses that are perfectly reminiscent of seaside towns. The area is so quiet I almost think its abandoned until I see the odd person sitting in their darkened store. I follow the sound of crashing waves and begin the unbalanced walk over the stones that make up the beach here. The water is beautiful. It’s been so long since I have seen blue waters.

The few people that are here are fully clothed and getting only their feet wet for a short time for photographs. I take some pictures for myself but soon I consider undressing to my bikini. I sit for a while. I’m not hugely confident that this is a beach for sunbathing. But I am here, and after calling myself a coward I race to remove my own dress so quickly that hesitation is unable to take hold of me. Moving straight to hide in the waves I quickly realize the sea deepens suddenly and carries the strongest current. I wouldn’t recommend using this beach for swimming.

what to do in HualienWhether it was the rush of excitement or the fact I have been absent of a beach for so long, I neglect to put any sunscreen on. Nearly two hours later I’m walking into a store for a cool drink and met with quite a gaze from the shop owner who motions towards my arms. I return to the hostel hidden under an umbrella and once I shower I realize how much damage I have done. I resemble a lobster in the transition of life to the boiling pot! The next few days involve fainting, drinking huge amounts of water and applying copious amounts of aloe gel onto my skin.

What to do in Hualien when it rains

After a few days recovering, still very pink, the heavens have opened to days of rain. My current state is appreciative of these cooler days. Yet finding what to do in Hualien, a city known for its scenery, in the rain isn’t the easiest. Had I the energy I would have ventured to Taroko gorge. The aboriginal tribe who reside in this area have aptly named this place. Taroko, in the language of Truku that belongs to the tribe, means “magnificent and splendid.” I may have only seen pictures but it is a place I regret not being able to make it to.

what to do in HualienNot up for anything to strenuous I walk in the rain in search of a place called Pine Garden. Along the way I come across Martyr’s Shrine. Perched high on a small hill at Meiluen Shan Park, the colorful roof of this beautiful architecture shone through the clouds and rain. After the Chinese Civil War, the shrine was built to honor the fallen Kuomintang soldiers. I was fortunate to have this place all to myself. I take some time to enjoy the peace of this area. After a while I walked up past the shrine to explore some gardens.

The command center of Pine Garden

what to do in HualienFollowing the road that leads around the shrine I continued on to find Pine Garden. Overlooking the Hualien harbor I reach an extremely well preserved and charming example of Japanese military structure. Situated at the highest point of Hualien city, Pine Garden was a strategic point that allowed the Japanese forces to command their battleships and fighter aircraft’s without difficulty. Today, it is a prestigious cultural hub dedicated to poetry in the beautiful city of Hualien. There is an eerie atmosphere behind its walls that leave some believing the building is haunted. Reach the top floor though and you will only find a gallery of unique artwork.

what to do in HualienAfter exploring the main building there is a coffee shop in the garden where you can rest for a snack. There is also two gift shops of charming trinkets that make great gifts or personal mementos. If you continue on the road past Pine Garden you will come across a store of artwork and wood carvings. Reaching the main road there are further monuments to take in and steps to take you down to the harbor.

I slightly ruined my Hualien trip for myself by punishing my skin in the sun. There is so much more to explore here and it is a great location to use as a base for bus trips to surrounding areas. Hualien will certainly move to my list of areas to revisit on my Taiwan travels.

Follow on Bloglovin
what to do in Hualien
Bunker at Pine Garden

what to do in Hualien

jiufen from keelungTaiwan’s summertime is notorious for its volatile weather. After a few days of consistent rain in Keelung I had exhausted most things you can do here on a rainy day. Not one to stay stuck indoors for too long I decided to find out how to get to Jiufen from Keelung. I figured why not move to a town for a day in the rain.

Although I enjoyed the day I do recommend you attempt to visit when it is nice weather. The views would have been stunning if it wasn’t for the mist and sea of umbrellas. There are areas to hike to make this a day packed with versatile activities. Enthusiasm wanes when you area wet through though.

Jiufen from Keelung

jiufen from keelungI am not one with an amazing sense of direction. Keelung fortunately has an amazing Information center at the bus station with many employees speaking English. To get to Jiufen from Keelung is so straightforward. You take the bus 788 all the way to the last stop. The cost is 30 NTD and the bus announces the stops in English also. You will arrive less than a minute from Shiqu Road (aka Jiufen Old Street).

The streets and alleys are narrow and today packed with tourists. The area was reinvented as a tourist destination in the 1990s following its attachment to several movies. The most well-known perhaps is Spirited away, where several of the buildings seem to have acted as inspiration for the movie. The other being A City of Sadness. This was the first film to openly discuss the 2-28 massacre and the White Terror era.

History of Jiufen and  Jinguashi

A beautiful town with a darker history. In 1893 gold was discovered in Jiufen. Following the Japanese control of Taiwan in 1896, the area developed into a prosperous gold mining town. During WWII the Japanese built a POW camp in Jiufen. Allied soldiers captured in Singapore were forced to work the mines in appalling conditions which resulted in many men dying. There is a Museum of Gold in Jinguashi that is worth visiting to better understand the history of the town. The museum is housed in an interesting location in the former offices of the Taiwan Metal Mining Corp. Many relics can be seen here including a giant piece of 999 pure gold weighing in at 220kg.

jiufen from keelung

What you should see in Jinguashi

jiufen from keelungComing all the way to Jiufen from Keelung meant I wanted to see more than the alleys and museum (both still would have been worth the trip). However Jinguashi offers more than this. Shuttle bus, taxi, walking, which ever is your preference, it’s not far to make your way down to the Golden Waterfall following a wander around Jiufen old street. Due to the  abundance of heavy metal elements deposited in the riverbed, the water flows a beautiful golden color. The cascading water is in stark contrast to its natural green setting. If you follow the stream down you can walk all the way to the Yin-Yang sea.

jiufen from keelungBefore you reach the sea you will enter a car park that is overlooked by the remains of Shuinandong Smelter; a refinery plant built during the Qing Dynasty and then was used by the Japanese during WWII to refine gold. Wandering down to the front this is not an ocean with a beach. But following the wall along I was lucky enough to make it down to where fisherman were out in the rain waiting for their catch. This area really is a place of natural beauty that makes a perfect break from the city.

jiufen from keelungMy timing to return to Keelung was poorly planned. I suggest going early to Jiufen from Keelung and either returning early or later in the evening. The traffic made the journey nearly two hours rather than our simple 30 minute ride to get there. I would also avoid bringing too much with you to carry as the narrow alleys don’t provide much in the way of space. All that being said, Jiufen is not a place to miss when you are in the North of Taiwan.

Follow on Bloglovin

jiufen from keelung

Google ‘a night out in Keelung’ and you’ll find endless information regarding the famous Miaokou Night Market or the Kanziding Fish Market. Yes, both are at night. Almost the whole night. But it’s not exactly what I had in mind for a Saturday night. I was looking for a different kind of neon night but where exactly to go on a night out in Keelung?

night out in keelung
Keelung Bar Crawl

Fortunately I was invited on a bar crawl. This is normally a polite ‘No’ from me. I like to choose the pace I drink in the environment that suits my vibe. But as I was minus the inside knowledge of bars in Keelung it was an immediate yes. A fairly enthusiastic one, even when a t shirt was produced for me to be “one of the gang.”

Being aware I was in a city, I was still surprised by how many places we visited for a night out in Keelung. My whole time here I have felt as though I was in a Port town as opposed to a city. Who knew Keelung had such a hidden network of bars tucked away in its alleys and narrow streets.

The definitive ‘Night out in Keelung’ list:
Alcohol Bar –  No. 23, Lane 3, Zhongyi Road, Ren’ai District, Keelung City, 200
night out in keelung
Alcohol Bar

The word for alcohol in Chinese is very similar to monkey and so it’s no surprise the logo for the establishment is a chimpanzee enjoying a glass of whiskey. This is one of the nicest whiskey bars I’ve been to and probably the nicest bar of the whole list. Slightly more pricey than the others, the variety and quality of whiskey that’s on offer is justification enough. Taiwan’s own award winning whiskey is on the menu here and a perfectly good reason to put this top of the list for a night out in Keelung.

Columbus Pub – 孝三路30巷23號 仁愛區, 基隆市 200
night out in keelung
Columbus Pub

This is definitely the place to go for those who like a little history on their night out in Keelung. Masked by the array of cocktails on offer is a story of how bars came to Keelung during the US involvement in the Vietnam War. Perhaps the original bar of Keelung, the walls proudly wear the history of its conception. If history and nostalgia aren’t your thing simply order one of the many western cocktails and toast with the locals.

Live House Bar –  200, Keelung City, Ren’ai District, Aiyi Road, 33號

The title says it all really. Live music, beer, you’ve got it all here. For me, the music doesn’t necessarily have to be my usual taste, if the bands having a good time and I’m in the right company, I can listen to most things.

So Fun Music Club –  基隆市仁愛區愛三路49巷38號2樓
night out in keelung
So Fun Music Club

A place for anyone who loves beer towers. Quite literally. There are also girls dressed to represent the Heineken brand. An easy place to sit with a group, drink and laugh. Not somewhere I’d feel comfortable coming by myself hoping to meet others as the layout really suits groups more. Maybe bar crawls aren’t such a bad idea after all.

Opus Two –  No. 19, Jing 1st Rd, Ren’ai District, Keelung City, 200
night out in keelung
Opus Two

A quaint British themed bar with random masks from Iron Man sums up this bar pretty well. It’s definitely a cozy place and I can’t imagine moving when it’s busy, but as a quick stop off on the route it serves it’s purpose perfectly. The staircase has the cutest pin board of Polaroids taken of fellow drinkers. I would have loved to have access to the camera to add to the Polaroids but the film is expensive and I’m pretty sure people would burn through it and result only in a capture of blurriness and forgotten memories.

 387 Music Bar – 仁愛區愛二路54巷11號, 200 Keelung, Taiwan
night out in keelung
387 Music Bar

The first place with a DJ. Tall, beautiful, female. This place immediately had a great vibe to it. Again not very big but I’m coming to realize that the bars here are all small. And down alleys which is why they are not the easiest to find! They all follow a nice route leading onto one another though so find the first and it won’t take long to discover the rest.

Fight Bar –  202, Keelung City, Zhongzheng District, Zhongzheng Road, 2號
night out in keelung
Fight Bar

With checkered floors that reminded me of Alice in Wonderland we have Fight Bar. This bar is small but on two levels. The first floor housing the bar and tonight a talented band. We manage to convince them to continue playing past the scheduled time and by the end of it the entire bar is singing. We finish on the pretty reckless. The second floor is a cozy seating area with a pool table.

Commecafe – No. 284, Xin’er Road, Zhongzheng District, Keelung City, 202

This is a place for the day and night. Come in the light and enjoy some delicious coffee. By night it’s a bar with a wall filled with empty Jack Daniels bottles and an acoustic guitar sitting in front. A relaxed vibe, it’s unfortunate we left this one till near the end of the night. Another easy bar to relax in as opposed to singing drunkenly along to the music. Fortunately for me, it’s at the end of the street where I’m staying so there will be a return visit.

night out in keelung
Commecafe
Q bar –  基隆市仁愛區仁一路293巷1號

Found down the smallest alley we enter the darkened room lit in red. The mood slightly changes here, feeling that you are in an upmarket bar that is designed and colored to create an atmosphere perfect for seduction. The bar in lined with local men and again this isn’t somewhere I’d come to explore alone.

 Big Machine – Ren Yi Road 49 Keelung, Taiwan 20141

The last on our tour at around 3am. Here you are able to order popcorn and chicken and play darts while horrifically drunk. All fun but potentially a hazard. None the less a good place to end the night. From what I remember the place seemed to fit the interior of a dinner but admittedly by this point I was a little drunk and not sure that my memory can be relied upon.

So there you have it. There are more bars of course, the names of which I don’t remember to match the location but I know we found a rock bar that shocked me. We entered from a lift and accidentally smashed a glass on our exit. Money in different currencies were displayed on the wall. I can’t tell you any more than that. It’s worth noting a lot of the drinking culture here is included with food so restaurants actually make a great place to drink with locals.

Now you know where to go on a night out in Keelung.

Follow on Bloglovin

Leaving the cosmopolitan city of Taipei behind I pack up and head towards the east coast. Going slightly North, in around 45 minutes the train reaches its destination. Keelung, the port city surrounded by mountains. If I was to compare Taipei to say Shanghai, Keelung would be Fuzhou. With many Fujian immigrants here familiarity of what was once home surrounds me. With my belongings strapped onto my back it’s time for walking in Keelung.

Getting around Keelung
Keelung for a Walk

Despite Keelung not being on my radar as a tourist city until now, public transport systems are great here. There are regular buses, trains, taxis, bicycles for hire…..my personal favorite will always be a scooter but unless you are extremely lucky (or charmingly persistent!) you will need a Taiwanese drivers licence to rent one. I suggest making friends. My favorite though is always walking. Walking in Keelung is a perfect way to absorb this city. Most sites are within 5 kilometers in every direction. Walking simply allows you to see so much more.

What brought me here was the opportunity to volunteer with Keelung for a Walk, a walking tour company that provides intimate tours of this secret port city. The tours involve personal interaction with all aspects of local life here. Walking in Keelung with Mila, the founder of ‘Keelung for a Walk’ gives you an authentic taste of Taiwanese culture. Her passion and enthusiasm for this city is infectious and inspirational.

Tours in the night
Miaokou night market

Fortunately travel, no matter how short the distance, always leaves me in need of a nap. There is a walking tour tonight at 11pm. I’m told we aim to finish around 2am, but 6am is the best time for the fish auction. I can’t imagine walking in Keelung is very exciting at 6am. Regardless I sleep and set my alarm.

Around 11:30pm the tour has gathered. Leading ahead, walking at an unmatched speed, is Mila. The city is alive. As I knew nothing of Keelung, I was slightly unprepared for the chaos of Miaokou night market. Our walking in Keelung tour starts at this famous market. You need go no further to sample from the largest selection of seafood in Taiwan. The alleys are filled with the sounds of the bustling crowd. Also, this is just the start!

The energy of a fish auction
Kanziding fish market

The main spectacle we are here to see leads on from Miaokou night market. As melted ice runs underfoot and the skies shine with lights usually found on shipping boats, we arrive at the fish auction. Kanziding fish market is the largest fishery distribution center in Northern Taiwan. I haven’t seen such an array of motionless color before. The selection is impressive and it’s clear the product is much sought after.

Mila is involved with various locals who all want to share Taiwanese life with visitors. We move through the crowds, the energy is almost overwhelming. Coming to various stands we pause for insight into the daily life of fishmongers. The locals of Keelung are very welcoming and it’s clear they are proud of their city and wish to promote tourism.

Fish auction

Following on from the fish auction it only seems right to try some local cuisine. Keeping with the theme of the night I enjoy a fish bowl as the morning dawns. Heading home it’s difficult to switch off after being in such a thriving environment of energy. Smiling, I’m happy to have accidentally found myself walking in Keelung.

Follow on Bloglovin
fish selection
fish on ice
famous local fish
artist village taipei
colorful studio

The weather is in it’s most volatile stage. Leaving the cooler days of spring and entering the humidity of summer leaves the skies open to a sudden down pour. Storms are always rolling in the clouds above. Today the rain is at least consistent. The skies grey since the sun attempted to rise. Lingering in a capsule hotel can bring on cabin fever. I’m not in the mood to shop. I read about an artist village on Treasure Hill and decided to walk in the rain until I found it.

Minutes in my shoes are wet through. I glance into shops in case I spot a very light weight waterproof coat. Traveling in rainy season when the climate is sub tropical means being as light as possible. Taipei has an amazing public transport system so do not be fooled into thinking the only way to this village is on foot. Regardless of the weather I always prefer to walk. Seeing the ‘everyday’ can only  really be done on foot.

artist village taipei
house of blades

The artist village is slightly tucked away. Although a spot frequented by tourist it is not like other commercial art scenes and so not sign posted. I decided to follow the graffiti. After a few uncertain wanderings down alleyways that lead to nowhere I saw the familiar gates to a temple. Having read that a temple resides close by I followed the route. Ascending a narrow path I entered a deserted collection of small buildings. I’m unsure as to how this area would look on a sunny day. It may be bustling with art seekers climbing up and down the many levels but today I’m surrounded in silence.

artist village taipei
world of imagination

The silence eerily suits the first sculpture I come across. A house of blades with a picture of a married couple. The structure is neatly composed of meat cleavers. There are a thousand messages a couple could take from this. The back drop is graffiti on the wall. Strange characters from the minds of creatives. This abandoned village is quite in contrast to its industrial surroundings.

I freely wander the alleys. Although it’s often my preference to wander alone, I’m slightly disappointed that the artist studios are all locked behind closed doors. Maybe it is just the weather or there are certain days that are better to visit. I would still recommend anyone looking to be inspired outside of the usual gallery to find themselves here, in rain or shine. Taipei has a few culture and art parks but this is one place that is unique against the rest.

artist village taipei
lonely bunny

The artist village, although resembling a forgotten place today, is actually a revamped area. Once being home to a community of squatters it is now a collection of studios for artist in residence to occupy for a period of 8-12 weeks. It is like walking through a nature maze intertwined with a haphazard collection of buildings, stacked upon each other and held in place with vines. The site itself is beautiful ground for photographers to walk and capture its quirkiness.

artist village taipei
IV drips and literature

Making my way down the staircases that occasionally end on rooftops, I find a platform overlooking a park. The small bridge crossing is unfortunately closed due to collapsing. I observe the walls of graffiti instead before heading out of this artist oasis back into the city. Although its raining and I haven’t seen a soul for at least two hours, Treasure Hills Artist village has been a perfect break from the bustling city. The area combines history with art and won’t disappoint to inspire anyone with a spark of creativity.

Follow on Bloglovin
artist village taipei
cinema
artist village taipei
resident bear
artist village taipei
graffiti walls

One of my last blog posts; Hiking Tiger Leaping gorge, and meeting a friend a few days into landing in the diverse, cosmopolitan city of Taipei, sparked two separate conversations. Both quite sensitive politically and both far beyond my knowledge of the history involved.

Taipei city

I had stated that Lijiang was the start of a new adventure and a fair-well to China. Yet, my feet have landed on Taiwanese soil. My statement wasn’t total ignorance, but maybe incorrect to one and sensitive to another. The Peoples Republic of China is a united ‘One China’ and Taiwan is a state longing for independence. My closest Chinese friend felt that I should alter the sentence. I left it with maybe too little thought given to the notion that it may offend. A few days later I’m walking through Chiang Kai shek Memorial Hall with a Taiwanese friend asking if Taiwan considers itself apart of China. She explained the delicacy of the question and I realized the little knowledge I had regarding the situation.

Taipei winding streets

I wandered through the galleries and museums of Taipei to gain an insight into the history. Walking through the streets alone you become acquainted with the past that still lives here. Taipei is a city that has tremendous pride; in its triumphant and tragic history. Memorials stand proud and the buildings of influence of those that once ruled are restored and reworked in a way to give them life again.

Of course Taipei, being a cosmopolitan city, offers more than just its history. The city is progressive. Its tolerance is something I’ve not experienced in China. The openness of the people and their excepting nature of the LGBT community are just a glimpse of the positivity that Taiwan holds in its uncertain future. The people are the most warm and friendly you could meet. Linger for too long at a map and someone will be beside you ensuring you are not lost.

Chiang Kai-Shek Memorial

Living in Fuzhou, Fujian, I’ve missed turning a street corner and being able to find a gallery or museum. Taipei is full of them. From the vast collection of ancient artifacts held in the National Palace Museum, to the contemporary exhibition of motion graphics at MOCA. For any art lover, historian and culture seeker, Taipei is a city that won’t disappoint.

After a day of drinking in the culture the evenings come alive. Night markets, restaurants, clubs and bars; all are plentiful in Taipei and you are sure to find whatever it is that will satisfy your appetite. For me this is why Taipei is the most perfect blend of cosmopolitan life, warm, proud people and home of some of the most exquisite example of traditional Taiwanese craft. I highly recommend a visit. It was MUIU capsule inn that brought me here. My first experience of a capsule hotel and a revisit to working in design.  I can truly say Taipei offered the perfect environment for inspiration.

Follow on Bloglovin
National Palace Museum
MOCA Taipei
Longshan Temple

The alarm is quite unwelcome this morning. It’s 6am. Nearly falling down the solid wooden staircase of the dorm bunk I reluctantly make my way to the shower. It’s cold and wet. It looks as though its rained all night. There is one other making this journey with me. A Norwegian who is even less impressed by the weather than the Welsh girl. We meet again at breakfast at 6:30am. The usual eggs and toast doesn’t feel hearty enough for day ahead. 6:50am we’re shuffled out the door. The bus is waiting for us at the end of the winding alley. Already my footwear feels inappropriate for the path I shall soon be on. This is the most unprepared I’ve been for a hike. I’ve gotten used to China’s version of hiking; stairs leading to a view point up a hill. But today, it’s Tiger Leaping Gorge.

barren mountains

Settling in on the bus I remove the already wet layers that need to last the day. Nothing is waterproof. My hiking gear is all comfortably stored in my brothers attic back in the UK. I didn’t see myself really hiking while living in China. The only semi appropriate kit I’m wearing are a pair of merrell hiking sandals. They have the grip but it is raining and they are sandals. I also have little faith that this temperature will increase as the day goes on. The Norwegian is assessing my attire. I can’t blame him. I’m slightly judging myself. He points out we’re on our way to Tiger Leaping Gorge and begins to laugh. I try to convince him, and myself, that the weather will change.

monkey standing guard

Two hours into the bus journey and the rain hasn’t lifted. We’re nearing the Norwegian’s destination. He is on the full two day hike starting at a village called Qiaotao. I’m further down the road for the day hike; starting at a place called Tina’s Guesthouse. As I’m volunteering in Lijiang I can only give the day to this much anticipated trek, but with my kit and the weather I’m thinking this is the best course for me to take. I will explore the middle of Tiger Leaping Gorge then hike to BenDi Wan village which is the half way point of the hike. From here I can follow the numerous bends to bring me down to the main road for the bus to collect me.

Arriving at Tina’s slightly later than planned I ignore my hunger and start my descent to the middle of Tiger Leaping Gorge. I have 5 hours total for exploring the middle of the gorge and hiking to the halfway point and dropping down to the road. Going by the hand drawn map available at Tina’s my schedule is tight. In fact going by the map I need exactly 5 hours. I’ve been assured the bus won’t wait. I have to be there when it passes for it to stop. I’m feeling exhilarated already. I’ve excepted that if I miss the bus I will hike back to the halfway point and stay at a guesthouse. The less exciting part will be the remaining hike the following day in wet clothes and the apology to my Workaway host for not making it back to Lijiang.

tiger leaping gorge

Staying positive I pay the 10 yuan entrance fee to an old woman dressed in the traditional Naxi style to access the middle of Tiger Leaping Gorge. Aware of my time restriction I use the descent to break into a gentle jog. At times I lose my footing as my eyes absorb the scenery surrounding me. For the first time in a while I forget my destination. The setting is reminiscent of the weekends I would spend hiking in Cumbria. The deep browns, rustic oranges and barren trees create such a nostalgia.

fierce water

The gorge’s roar is echoing off the mountain walls. The route is a mixture of dirt track, scrambling on rocks and climbing up and down iron ladders wedged between rocks. There is no one else around. In the current weather conditions it would only take one misjudged step and the result could be catastrophic. Getting closer to the water the views are stunning. There are little huts with fruit sellers where you can take rest. There are also various access routes to get closer to the water that have been built by the local families of the area. For a small fee of 10 yuan you can walk across a wooden bridge that shakes and bounces simultaneously. I also get a ticket for 15 yuan to climb the iron sky ladder near the end of the route.

hand made bridges

Reaching the closest point to the water I sit in silence and observe natures power. The water rolls like white horses galloping out of the sea. The Gorge runs for about 15km in length and at its highest point has a maximum depth of 3790m. The river running wildly through the gorge is called Jinsha River. The story goes a hunter chased a tiger through the gorge and at its narrowest point the tiger leaped to the other side and escaped the hunter. Hence the name ‘Tiger Leaping Gorge’. Feeling the pressure of the chase of time I get up and begin the search for the sky ladder. There are a few locals in the huts boiling tea and after my best impression of climbing a ladder in thin air I was directed to my intended destination.

sky ladder

The sky ladder is a vertical climb. My own weight is pulling away from the ladder with a wire tunnel surrounding me as my only support. with a heavy breath I reach the top and crawl back on to the dirt track. The route from here is a steady incline back to Tina’s. I’ve made it in good time, spending an 1 1/2 at the middle of the gorge. The jog bought me an extra 30 mins to my anticipated time to dedicate to the high trail. Reaching Tina’s and still ignoring my hunger I cross the road to begin the second part of the expedition.

Initially taking the wrong route I find myself in farm land face to face with a caged monkey. There is a moment of silence from us both until I remove my phone for a picture. The monkey begins screaming and shaking against the cage and I realize this is a version of a guard dog. Turning back I look for the now obvious route and for the first time meet people on the path. They are returning from the two day adventure and so finishing at Tina’s where I started. There are painted arrows and colored cloth hanging from trees to aid in the navigation of the high trail.

high views of tiger leaping gorge

Various routes present themselves throughout this hike due to locals trekking with horses in the area. During peak season and in the earlier trail at Qiaotao the horses are available to ride to the top. This isn’t something I would recommend as I feel if you’re here you are here to hike and work for the stunning views from the top. As I get into my route there is no sign of horses or any more hikers coming to the end of the trail. I spend the rest of the hike alone. This is the perfect environment for me, alone and isolated in nature.

hiking in clouds

As the weather continues to decline I ascend into the clouds and feel the cold numb my skin. By this point my clothes are damp and the sandals provide no comfort. My fingers are becoming numb and I’m becoming increasingly aware of the dangers of this condition. The result of this thought process is a quick picture to my brother of my location and a break into a steady jog. At times the path narrows and I need to walk hugging into the cliff face. I continue my run until I warm up while desperately trying to keep my footing and take in every spectacular view that each bend offers. This journey could be just as difficult in Yunnan’s summer heat. I recommend everyone to come far more prepared than I.

narrow path

As the heat begins to comfort my body I reduce my pace to a brisk walk and enter the village of BenDi Wan. Its the afternoon and I feel my presence is unexpected. I don’t notice any life other than the sounds of nature and so don’t stop for a meal. I’m also concerned on my time frame and so walk on with a banana and find the bends to descend to the main road. Slipping at regular intervals but catching my balance I make my way down the path that seems to never end. When I finally reach the road I am 40 minutes ahead of schedule. Taking the time to eat the food that I at least did prepare, it is not long before I start cooling down.

mountain peaks in clouds

The bus arrives as I’m circling the road in an attempt to keep warm. I meet a gentleman from Nepal who was also on the bus when I arrived. We talk about hiking trails the world over and future destinations are logged in my memory to research for new adventures. This is my last trip in China for sometime and I couldn’t have chosen a more perfect location. The culture of the minorities in China have always appealed more to me for their traditions and history. The Naxi people of Yunnan are incredibly welcoming and humble. Leaving Lijiang is a start of a new adventure but a very sad farewell to this country I have had the privilege to call home for the last nine months.

Follow on Bloglovin

After visiting the highly commercialized Lijiang Old Town at night I decided I wanted a more authentic experience of Naxi daily life. Enticing with its bright lights and buzzing sound of life well into the night, Lijiang Old Town for me has lost some of its charm. Rather than being given a glimpse of Naxi culture to appreciate, you are often over charged for the same trinkets that line the alleys. At night the water turns to wine as the clubs open and the youth enthusiastically open their wallets and jump up and down out of sync with each other as their inhibitions fade into the night. A far cry from the slow lifestyle used to describe the warm and welcoming Naxi people. So today is a day for exploring ancient towns. It is a scenic walk to Shuhe followed by a visit to Baisha which sits at the foot of Jade Dragon Snow Mountain.

Lijiang Old Town

Leaving October Inn I wind through the whimsical alleys. There are flowers hanging from baskets and leaking droplets of water onto the dusty ground. Stone, wood and slate make a striking combination to the old architecture that makes up this part of Lijiang. It is never just my destination that is the scenic pleasure of the trip. Lijiang offers such beauty and is best explored on foot or by bicycle. With the many short cuts the alleys give way to it is not long before i reach the south gate to Lijiang Old Town. It is the more ancient towns that I head for today though so I wander down the road and towards the North entrance of Black Dragon Pool.

Shuhe entrance

A lot of the old part of Lijiang sits in contrast with the new architecture that is springing up everywhere. Unfortunately if there is one thing that never seems to stop in China, it is construction work. The modern design is sensitive to that of its surrounding style but together there is a clear divide between the old and new. What is slightly less obvious are the partial towns that are being developed in the style of old. If it wasn’t for witnessing construction and seeing merchants start the beginnings of setting up shop, I would have mistaken these fusion builds for old, near abandoned relics of a town that is no more.

Shuhe architecture

Leaving Black Dragon Pool in my rear view I’m in owe every time the town opens up to reveal Jade Dragon Snow Mountain. I have no real hiking kit with me in China otherwise it would be those snowy peaks I’d be reaching for as today’s accomplishment. For now, it is ‘the hometown of springs’ for my first destination. The ancient town of Shuhe. Shuhe is one of the earliest settlements of the Naxi people and an extremely well preserved example of a town along the ancient tea route.

horses in Shuhe

Without Tom I wind up walking to the main entrance of Shuhe and needing to pay the admittance fee of 40 yuan. There are many routes in for free but it is knowing where they start. The ancient towns do also fall on the bus route of numbers 6 and 11 for Shuhe and number 6 at the last stop for Baisha. If you take the bus to Shuhe I recommend walking to Baisha. It takes less than an hour and you’ll wander through one of the deserted fusion towns I mentioned earlier.

One thing that caught my attention wandering through Shuhe was the small open stalls that held locals playing small hand drums and playing a beat more familiar with African culture than Asian. Each time I passed one of these drum stalls I could have sworn the same song echoed out of them. Altered by the lost rhythm of the tourists that clambered in to join them. Live music is also a constant present in the streets of Shuhe with some incredible talent coming out of coffee shops and restaurants. I stop for lunch after hours of wandering. I’ve chosen The Cafe on the Creek to enjoy the calm of the water than runs through the town.

charming buildings in Shuhe

Once I’ve had my fill of food and Yunnan’s delicious coffee, it’s back on my feet and to my favorite app MAPS.ME to find the route to Baisha. Walking through rural areas give a better impression of life for the Naxi people. I pass two old women in their traditional dress and can’t help but admire how hard they seem to have worked their entire lives. I hold my phone up for a picture but they decline and I move on with only a memory of their image. The road to Baisha is open and stunning rural landscape. The town of Lijiang does offer such a balanced blend of modern, ancient, convenience and escape.

architecture in Shuhe

Getting closer to the majestic snowy mountain, I stumble into Baisha. It is later in the evening now so the town is incredibly quiet. The silence is penetrated by the growl of a dog as I try to quietly wander into the very closed Naxi Embroidery Institute. It is the most influential embroidery institute in Lijiang and aims to promote, preserve and develop other ethnic minority cultures, including Naxi, Dongba culture and Tangka culture. The dog manages to rustle up the attention of a young student who enters the courtyard. I apologies and begin to leave when he attempts a dialogue in broken English. The result is a private tour around the gallery of embroidered artwork. There are pieces in there that so closely resemble the delicacy of oil paintings that I linger staring as close as I can to the glass box they sit in.

route to Baisha

I only capture one photograph of the gallery; I’m informed photographs aren’t allowed so I apologize and try not to take up too much more of the students time. Baisha is the smaller of the ancient towns and it’s not long before I reach the end of the road. I seek a local to aid in locating the bus stop as the walk back to Lijiang and up the hill to October Inn was only a little shy of three hours! I’m loosing light also and so I patiently wait nearly 40 minutes for the number 6 bus. There are mini vans that can drive you for 50yuan which if you fill the car isn’t so bad, if you’re happy to wait though the bus is a mere 1 yuan for the return journey.

style of Baisha

Exploring the ancient towns has left me which a rather big appetite. Upon my arrival I smell Toms cooking and sit with my fellow travelers to discuss the days adventures. There are an American couple who arrived back from Tiger Leaping Gorge. After hearing their stories I book my bus ticket for the day trip to the gorge. The weather ahead is planned for rain and I don’t have hiking gear on me so going for the day, although slightly disappointing, is by far the sensible option. So come back to visit the Solo Pursuit for the adventure of Tiger Leaping Gorge.

Follow on Bloglovin
Naxi Embroidery Institute
embroiders tables
embroidery gallery