This was my last trip exploring Fujian province before leaving my ‘home’ of Fuzhou. An escape to the scenic area of Wu Yi Shan, home to an array of plant species and wild animals. Drawn in by its tranquil beauty, I spent a weekend exploring Wu Yi Shan’s primitive forest, drifting on the water of Wuyi Canyon, and wandering around the caves and tea plantations that make up this stunning and protected scenic spot.

map of wu yi shan

Sunday 6pm. Work is over. Myself and my weekend travel companion have our bags. The bus is on its way, we already have our train tickets. We’re set. Around two hours later the train and bus are behind us and we are exploring Wuyishan city heading to our hotel. We purchase tickets for Wu Yi Shan, pick up an illustrated map and get an early night to prepare for the next few days. We have two and a half days to cover the 60 square kilometers of this natural and cultural heritage site.

 

Not starting quite as early as planned and our mood being slightly dampened by the weather, we have breakfast and make our way to the bus to take us to the site. Although having a Chinese friend with me makes the travel process incredibly efficient, the area is very tourist friendly and signs, for the most part, are in English as well as Chinese. Stepping off the bus and taking in the surrounding nature, for the first time I’m aware of how fresh the air quality is. Fuzhou is one of the cleaner air cities in China but I have forgotten how crisp fresh air can feel on a cold day. My mood is immediately lifted and we venture inside the site.

wu yi shan views

The area provides transport to and from the various scenic spots in this mountainous area. We are dropped off and we pick one of the many routes to see where the road takes us. The views are stunning. The mountains are layered with lush forest echoing the sounds of birds and various wildlife. The waters are emerald, clear and full of life. Tearing myself away from the natural beauty we follow the path leading to the Memory Hall of Zhuxi, a Song dynasty philosopher and the founder of Idealism Confucian. The memorial hall was once Wannian Palace and its courtyard houses two cassia trees of one thousand years old.

 

memory hall of zhuxi
monuments to zhuxi

 

Continuing around the remains of Wuyi Palace,  the oldest Taoist temple in Mount Wuyi, you are aware of the ancient history of this beautiful setting. The gardens hold impressive monuments that are perfect examples of China’s exquisite art. Temple walls hold inscriptions of Taoist teachings and pavilions provide shelter to simply sit and look upon the surrounding beauty. Following the path to an old town you can purchase local crafts and take in the stunning architecture. Wu Yi Shan is famous for its tea that grows in the plantations here and so the tea sets available are some of the most elegant I’ve seen in China.

wuyi palace
wuyi palace temple
taoist text

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

donhongpao tea plantation

It is to Da Hong Pao that we venture next. located at the center of Wu Yi Shan, inside the jiulong Nest Grand Canyon. The pathway is enclosed by step cliffs either side and growing out of the cliffs you can see the world-renowned Da Hong Pao tea. This scenic area houses several precious teas but Da Hong Pao is most revered for its color, aroma and taste. People always comment that the British love their tea but non celebrate it with more ceremonial elegance than the Chinese. To drink tea here is to be apart of a historical tradition.

The following day we head to the pick up point for the bamboo raft trip. Taking to the water you become immersed in the poetic landscape. Nine Bend Stream, the name given due to its abrupt changes in course nine times over, is the center piece of Wu Yi Shan. Sitting back and taking in the view of unusually shaped mountains, waterfalls and caves inscribed with ancient text, you lose yourself in natures overpowering serenity. Glancing in to the crystal waters you can see fish and turtles swimming contentedly alongside the raft. The boatmen are cautious in their rows and seem just as in awe of the scenery as though it was the first time their eyes had laid upon it.

bamboo rafting
water curtain cave

With the rafting drawing to a close we hike in search of more water in the form of the Water Curtain Cave. This is the largest cave of Wu Yi Shan and can receive over a thousand visitors. Following the paths steady incline we reach its peak where we find a man feeding a flock of white birds. The backdrop to this scene are mountains and tea plantations. It’s not hard to feel you have been transported into a piece of Chinese classical literature. Taking the bend to the left the water curtain reveals itself. Set in the hues of blues and greens, this waterfall that fronts the cave is responsible for its creation. The cave being eroded by the force of flowing water making it unlike the many other karst caves of the area. You can wander the higher ground to explore the ruins of temples and see the cliff carvings. The sticks placed under the curve of the rocks have their own charm also.

 

ancient cliff text

There are many hiking trails you can take here for stunning views of the entire park. Tianyou Peak gives panoramic views of the mountainous area and is located in the center of Wu Yi Shan. Unfortunately this was our last attempt of the day. With heavy legs we decided to stop half way and took rest at a pavilion, watching others continue the ascention of the stone staircase. Regardless of the level you reach you will not be disappointed with the views you find. Choosing a narrow path down between two cliffs we reach the bottom and return to our hotel for another day.

 

The final day is a half day as we need to return to Fuzhou for work. It would seem then to be a perfect day to explore the temples of Wu Yi Shan. There are grande new buildings in place for worship that, although beautiful, lack the charm of the older, simple temples that can be found if you are prepared to wander. Unlike the new temple, we find a smaller one that is void of other visitors. The building is much more simple in its design with passages to open small courtyards that hold plants and offerings to the gods for prayer. Opposite the temple are living quarters where the monks simple robes are hanging to dry. Bamboo holds these earthen colored fabrics in the air and they sway hypnotically in the wind.

modern temple
temple gods

Past the old temple is a beautiful building that is the living quarters of the monks. The windows are cased in wood, the overall design isn’t entirely recognizable as traditional Chinese architecture but fits the surroundings sympathetically. If you continue on you reach a magnificent view-point at the base of a striking white pagoda. Feeling a little rushed we make our way to a bus pick up point to return to the hotel and prepare for our leave. For anyone who has a love of nature, hiking, history and architecture, Wu Yi Shan should certainly be on your Fujian bucket list.

Follow on Bloglovin
old temples
monks living quarters
cliff temple ruins
white pagoda
chinese artist sculptures

 

Author

Searching for an extroadinary life by exploring this beautiful world and documenting my experiences and all that I've learned.

Write A Comment